Let me sleep until the world ends
Let me sleep until the world ends
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obeytheprophecy:

▲ obey the prophecy ▲ the door to wonderland
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obeytheprophecy:

▲ obey the prophecy ▲ the door to wonderland
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electronickandi:

bassfeedsthesoul.com
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pewblahh:

got it from here
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heythereuniverse:

Rat Cerebellum | Thomas Deerinck
Fluorescence image of a rat cerebellum stained to reveal the distribution of inositol triphosphate receptors in Purkinje neurons (green), GFAP in glial cells (red), and DNA throughout the cells (cyan). The image was acquired by multiphoton microscopy using an inverted microscope equipped with a custom high-speed multiphoton system.
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fractalotl:

Eye organ of a Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) third-instar larvae pictured in the confocal technique at 60 times magnification.
Credit: Dr. Michael John Bridge | University of Utah HSC Core Research Facilities - Cell Imaging Lab
7th place, Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition, 2012
http://www.nikonsmallworld.com/galleries/entry/2012-photomicrography-competition/7
Haha! It’s an eye-heart! Get it?
I <3…
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heythereuniverse:

Hippocampus | Tamily Weissman
"Brainbow" mice are engineered with a gene that includes three different fluorescent proteins, but only one color is actually expressed from each copy of the DNA construct. Pairs of "incompatible lox sites" are nested around different portions of the gene, allowing for recombination to snip out different parts of the gene randomly. Depending on what DNA is excised, a different color results.
heythereuniverse:

Hippocampus | Tamily Weissman
"Brainbow" mice are engineered with a gene that includes three different fluorescent proteins, but only one color is actually expressed from each copy of the DNA construct. Pairs of "incompatible lox sites" are nested around different portions of the gene, allowing for recombination to snip out different parts of the gene randomly. Depending on what DNA is excised, a different color results.
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biocanvas:

Larva from the peanut worm, Nephasoma pellucidum
Worms from the phylum Sipuncula, commonly known as peanut worms, live in marine habitats and use small tentacles to gather organic debris from the water. First described in 1827 by a French zoologist, a related species was later identified by famed invertebrate zoologist E. Ray Lankester. Lankester dissected the new species between rounds of golf in Scotland. In celebration of his golfing holiday, he decided to name the species Golfingia vulgaris, which was later sorted into the Sipuncula phylum.
Image by Dr. Michael Boyle, Smithsonian Institution.
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